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Tomb of Ramses IX (KV 6)

Pharaoh Ramses IX was the eighth ruler of the Twentieth Dynasty in the New Kingdom Period of Ancient Egypt. He re-established stability in the country after the chaotic period following the death of Ramses VI. According to Papyrus Turin, Ramses IX reigned for 18 years and 4 months and died in year 19 of his reign. His tomb ( KV 6 ) is the first tomb that had been opened since antiquity, and dozens of inscriptions in the tomb were left by ancient visitors. This tomb was the last royal tomb to be dug in the Valley of the Kings in Luxor. The tomb has a simple plan, influenced in its early stages by the Tomb of Ramses III ( KV 11 ). In addition to this, the tomb has much in common with the Tomb of Ramses VI ( KV 9 ) from a decorative and archaeological standpoint. The size of the tomb is average for royal tombs in spite of its abbreviated plan, but the dimensions of its gates and corridors are the widest in the Valley.

– Corridor B of the Tomb of Ramses IX (KV 6)

On the left wall of Corridor B of the Tomb of Ramses IX (KV 6), the King stands before gods Re-Horakhty and Osiris in a kiosk. A fine band of lion-headed uraei and cartouches run across the top of the wall. To the right, there are 67 columns of text of the Litanies of Ra, known in ancient times as “The Book of Praying to Ra in the West” or as “Praying to the United One in the West”. At right, Iwnmutef-Priest purifies Osiris with ankh-signs as part of the Opening of the Mouth ritual. In spite of damage, we can see that the hieroglyphs are nicely drawn. King Ramses IX stands in a shrine offering incense to Amun, Ra-Horakhty and Meretseger. On the right wall, the god has four ram heads and wears his crown. The goddess wears a crown indicating that she is the Goddess of the West. To the left are scenes from the first part of the Book of Caverns. On the ceiling, huge vultures with outstretched wings alternate with the names and titles of the king. At the end of the corridor, there is a solar disc with a ram-headed god, a baboon, and a man kneeling in adoration, flanked by figures of the King and a vulture.

– Corridor C of the Tomb of Ramses IX (KV 6)

On the right wall of Corridor C of the Tomb of Ramses IX (KV 6), there is a single leaf door guarded by a snake. After that, in the lower register, there is a ram-headed god with the second hour of the Book of Caverns. In the upper left section, the King pours a libation for Amun-Ra. The ceiling contains scenes similar to those found in the Tomb of Ramses VI (KV 9). There is a set of drawings along the edges (known as the “Unweary”) which represent the Egyptian constellations. At the end of the chamber above the gate, there are figures of the King, accompanied by family members, then a ram-headed deity is accompanied by a baboon and the Eye of Horus. On the left wall of Corridor C, we can see an inscribed door leaf followed by the figures of fifteen demons shown in thirteen ovals. Among the upper register, there are scenes from the Litany of Ra, the Imydwat, and the Book of the Dead. Moving down to the lower register, at left, King Ramses IX is represented holding a large stela bearing his names and titles accompanied by Hathor. To the right, we have texts of Chapter 125 of the Book of the Dead written in thirty columns. At the end of this wall, the King stands in adoration before Khonsu, Neferhetep and Shu.

– Corridor D of the Tomb of Ramses IX (KV 6)

The right wall of Corridor D of the Tomb of Ramses IX (KV 6) is called “Enigmatic” because its unique scenes and texts are a combination of several books of the Netherworld. On the left wall, there is a scene for Hours and the Imydwat. The King offers a small figure of Maat to Ptah and Maat at right (the costumes here are nicely drawn). To their left, the King is depicted as Osiris, and a solar disc and a scarab appear above. In the upper register, there is only a row of eight human figures, while in the middle register, a serpent-shaped solar bark sails across Apophis. In the lower register, there is a variation of texts of Chapter 106 of the Book of the Dead, then follow four goddesses and four bend backward figures related to the infant sun disk.

– Chamber E of the Tomb of Ramses IX (KV 6)

On the left of Chamber E of the Tomb of Ramses IX (KV 6), before a ram-headed standard, the priest is shown up a bowl; on the right, before an ibis standard, offering adzes for the Opening of the Mouth ritual. In the rear wall of this chamber, on either side of the gate, there is a representation of two well dressed figures of Iwnmutef-priests stand.

– Burial Chamber J of the Tomb of Ramses IX (KV 6)

Like those of King Ramses VI, both the left and right walls of the Burial Chamber of the Tomb of Ramses IX (KV 6) show scenes from the Book of the Earth. We can see on the rear wall the journeys, in daytime and nighttime, made by the King and god in solar barks. On the left, the bark is with six gods of the north; on the right stand eight gods of the south. Then below, the King, accompanied by various gods, stands before a large decorated shrine. The ceiling shows figures of goddess Nut and the solar disk. On either side are scenes from the Book of the Day and the Book of the Night.

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