en +201003851009

Login

Sign Up

After creating an account, you'll be able to track your payment status, track the confirmation and you can also rate the tour after you finished the tour.
Username*
Password*
Confirm Password*
First Name*
Last Name*
Email*
Phone*
Country*
* Creating an account means you're okay with our Terms of Service and Privacy Statement.

Already a member?

Login
en +201003851009

Login

Sign Up

After creating an account, you'll be able to track your payment status, track the confirmation and you can also rate the tour after you finished the tour.
Username*
Password*
Confirm Password*
First Name*
Last Name*
Email*
Phone*
Country*
* Creating an account means you're okay with our Terms of Service and Privacy Statement.

Already a member?

Login

x Mastaba of Queens Khenut and Nebet

Queens Nebet (Nebit) and Khenut were wifes of King Unas (Unis). The Double Mastaba of Nebet and Khenut is located in the section of the Pyramid of their husband, in the Necropolis of Saqqara. It originally covered an area of 161ft/49m by 72ft/22m and stood 13ft/4m high. The two parts of the double mastaba are equal with the same ground plan and layout. While the part of Nebet is well-preserved, fascinating and worth close inspection, that of Khenut is much ruined. It comprises three rooms with the second as the most interesting. A gallery can be reached through a doorway from the second room. What is most fascinating in this gallery are the walls which are beautifully decorated. The entrance, on the southeast side, leads into an antechamber of some size. Walls of this antechamber are decorated with some reliefs of Queen Nebet sailing in a boat through the marshes, as well as scenes of funerary equipments, offerings, livestock, and the harem. Nebet is also shown with servants bringing in food and sledges laden with large jars; one of the women of the harem is a dwarf. In another scene, the Queen is shown seated in front of votive offerings. A marvelous scene presents the Queen with her daughters receiving votive offerings, particularly livestock. A corridor leads into a chapel with four niches for statues of the Queen. Opposite these, on the east wall, are reliefs depicting votive offerings. There are depictions of four large unguent vessels on the tomb’s walls.

Best Flight Rates Ever
Best Flight Rates Ever

Sponsors

Best Hotel Deals
Best Hotel Deals