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x Tomb of Neferu-Ptah

In 1956, the Egyptian Antiquities Service started digging in the area south-east of the Pyramid of Amenemhat III where the Tomb of Princess Neferu-Ptah (Neferuptah) was discovered. The tomb’s owner was the daughter of Amenemhat III. She was one of the first royal women whose name was written inside a cartouche. Among the titles she held were “member of the elite, great of favour, great of praise and beloved king’s daughter of his body”. Although she never had the title ‘king’s wife’, she must have had a special status. A burial for her was prepared in the tomb of her father at Hawara. However, she was not buried there, but in a small pyramid at Hawara. Inside her tomb was found a big pink granite sarcophagus, some three silver vessels, as well as a magnificent collection of gold jewelry and semi-precious stones (now on display in the Cairo Museum). Inside the granite sarcophagus which was inscribed with a short offering formula, there were found decayed remains of two wooden coffins.

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